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Title: "Communicating Climate Change II – Global Goes Regional, Pre-conference to the ECREA 2010 – 3rd European Communication Conference".
Target participants: ECREA members (but open to all)
Affiliation: KlimaCampus Hamburg / Institut für Journalistik und Kommunikationswissenschaft
Venue: Hamburg University Guest House
Date: Oct 11 - Oct 12, 2010
Contact: inga.schlichting@uni-hamburg.de
Call for papers: http://www.ecrea2010hamburg.eu/frontend/index.php?page_id=178
Website: http://www.ecrea2010hamburg.eu

The climate change has emerged as one of the most important global agendas. On its way from a subject of scientific inquiry to the issue of general public, debates on climate change have not only spread widely but also undergone transformations. Most importantly, the issue has expanded to the regional level, both in the cases of scientific climate research and media discourse. Accordingly, the conference on ‘Communicating Climate Change II – Global Goes Regional’ focuses on regional aspects of the global climate change.

Overview

The climate change has emerged as one of the most important global agendas. On its way from a subject of scientific inquiry to the issue of general public, debates on climate change have not only spread widely but also undergone transformations. Most importantly, the issue has expanded to the regional level, both in the cases of scientific climate research and media discourse. Accordingly, the conference on ‘Communicating Climate Change II – Global Goes Regional’ focuses on regional aspects of the global climate change.

The events of natural disasters and extreme weather whether it is drought or intense rainfall, floods, cyclones, earthquakes, tsunamis, storm surges, wildfires, heatwaves, or volcanic eruptions are being increasingly linked by the media with climate change. Media are making the abstract global phenomenon regionally tangible by adding a transcultural and global dimension to regional geohazards. By regional geohazards we mean threats by extreme weather and extreme natural events of geophysical origin, which only in their circular interaction between human and nature develop into a hazard. Repetitions of these occurrences pose a permanent threat to communities in respective regions. Prerequisite for a geohazard is the awareness of the threat that results primarily from the memories of a catastrophic and traumatic key event. Examples include storms and storm surges of the North Atlantic coast in the Netherlands, Great Britain, and Germany; hurricanes in the U.S. East Coast and the Gulf of Mexico; tropical cyclones in the Bay of Bengal and Asia Pacific; volcanic eruptions in Italy; earthquakes in Japan; avalanches in the Alps; floods and wildfires.

It is against this background that the pre-conference aims to explore the following questions: How do the media represent global climate change and regional geohazards? How do they construct the memory of extreme weather events? What transcultural similarities and cultural specificities can be identified? How does reporting on human-nature interaction develop? How do recipients perceive climate change and regional geohazards and what cultural commonalities and differences can be discerned? How political decisions are taken on climate change issues both in local and regional levels and what role the media play in the process? What immediate, medium or long-term local or global strategies are discussed in media discourses? How mitigation and adaptation related to catastrophe and risk of changing climate are being reported in the media? Which actors and experts are dominating the media coverage? What discourses can be identified?

The pre-conference will feature the presentations of peer-reviewed papers as well as distinguished key-note speakers from an interdisciplinary field of research who will examine important aspects of communicating global climate change on a regional level.

Keynotes
The keynotes of the pre-conference "Communicating Climate Change II – Global Goes Regional" will be given by Hans von Storch (GKSS/University of Hamburg), Dominique Brossard (University of Wisconsin/Madison) and Shelly Ungar (University of Toronto).

Call for Papers
The organisers call for proposals of all aspects of the interdisciplinary field of climate communication research: Media and communication studies as well as political, sociological and economic studies.
All submitted papers will be peer-reviewed.

Deadline
All proposals should be submitted no later than 15 March 2010. Please note that this submission deadline will not be extended!
All proposals should be submitted through the ECREA 2010 website.

Online submission system opens on 10th January 2010.
To avoid technical problems, early submission is strongly encouraged.

Timeline
10 January 2010: Online submission system open
15 March 2010: Deadline for online submission of abstracts (3.500 characters max)
15 May 2010: Notification of acceptance
15 September 2010: Deadline for submission of full papers (for preparation of the conference)

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